Cry, Heart, but never break (Death & Inspiration)

Cry, Heart, but never break (Death & Inspiration)

Published — 22 April 2022

These last few years in particular seem to have brought the experience and reality of death more to the forefront of many of our minds. So many have witnessed the deaths of those they love, many have lost their lives and others have heard about such vast numbers of people dying all over the world. It can be a challenging subject to navigate for ourselves, because it is often considered taboo to talk about or dwell on, yet it is the one certainty in life: that we will all die.  

This has been a particularly strong part of my practice this year, having experienced several significant deaths in a short space of time. Something that drew them all together and that has had a strong impact, was the fact that they all seemed so ‘alive’ and ‘cut short’ in their lives. It leaves me pondering my own life, and that of those around me – death is certain and its exact arrival is unknown.  

To some, this may seem an incredibly morbid subject, but for me it seems more an inspiration. There is an aliveness in being conscious of death. It is a reminder of our own death and can be an inspiration and reminder to live our lives with more fullness and perhaps taking more opportunities to feel the fear and do it anyway in some circumstances where we tend to hold ourselves back. There is a Mary Oliver poem called ‘When death comes,’ that really speaks of this for me, where she says she wants to be able to say ‘I was a bride married to amazement. I was the bridegroom, taking the world into my arms.’ So we may find inspiration to experience our lives and the world with a greater depth. And my experience is that Rosen can support us to do that – to open to a fuller picture of our own experience, emotions and truth and therefore to open more fully to the world. 

Death can also be a doorway into love. When we lose someone or nearly lose someone who we care about, it can allow us to open naturally towards love. This isn’t likely to be the whole of our experience, and it may not be our experience at all. But for me this has been a reality of opening to death over the last few years. We may find that the heart cracks open and allows us to peek inside, to feel the depth of the love that we feel for fellow humans (and therefore the capacity for love that we have for ourselves too). This may also allow the potential to open to the world more widely: all beings experience loss, death reaches us all, so we can see a shared humanity, a shared experience. We can love one another in our shared grieving, our shared experience of loss and bereavement. There may be a little more space for more of ourselves, more of others and more of the world.

There is a beautiful children’s book which speaks of this too which I was recently recommended. ‘Cry, Heart, But Never Break’ by Glenn Ringtved, which is a beautifully written and illustrated story about a dying grandmother, and the connection between grief and joy.  

Recent bereavement may not be an ideal time to start having Rosen sessions, however it may be that the work allows us to unfold, unravel and open a little to our experience from a past bereavement. If you are interested in finding out more about Rosen, do get in touch. I offer free consultation calls to get an idea of me and to find out more. This also gives me an opportunity to hear about you and find out whether the work might be suitable for you at this time in your life.  

Warmly and with gratitude, 

Anna x 

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Cry, Heart, but never break (Death & Inspiration)

Cry, Heart, but never break (Death & Inspiration)

22 April 2022
Death can be a challenging subject to navigate for ourselves, because it is often considered taboo to talk about or dwell on, yet it is the one cer…

As a Rosen Method Intern, I am practicing under supervision. All information you share with me is confidential and I adhere to the Rosen Institute codes of conduct and am a member of the Complimentary Health Professionals (CHP) and The Rosen Institute (RI).

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